BOOKS  (for details click on dropdown tabs)

​ ADVERT
                                                 “Of course we marry cousins.  What would you                                                                        have us do, marry strangers?”
                                                                                               
                                                                               Groom at a Baghdad wedding (Tierney 2003)

Chap. 19: "Marry In or Die Out: Optimal Inbreeding and  the Meaning of Mediogamy." (Paradigm, 2015)

 Abstract

     This is a re-thinking of the analysis of exogamy and endogamy with a new approach to the adaptive benefits of the latter.  Bateson’s principle of optimal inbreeding in plants and animals, leads to the definition of mediogamy (close cousin marriage) as the human equivalent.  Incest avoidance is examined as the driver of human exogamy and as a form of dispersion subject to general laws of fragmentation and dispersion.  The basic forms of exogamic marriage, the human phenomenon of endogamy through parallel cousin marriage, dispersion in animals and humans and its relationship to the preservation of the optimal number (after Malthus) are examined. The possibility is explored that a mechanism other than resource optimization is responsible for population segmentation and dispersion across species, namely optimization of fertility by consanguineous mating.   Data from four taxa and from human birth records suggest that the same underlying mechanisms are present from single-celled organisms to humans, governing population fluctuations and fragmentation that have to do with preserving levels of fertility through optimal inbreeding and losing them through dilution of consanguinity.  This challenges the Malthusian resource-based paradigm, and makes mediogamy the optimal strategy in human mating systems. The consequences of its decline for fertility levels in current populations are suggested.



KINSHIP AND LAND TENURE ON TORY ISLAND.

Belfast NI: Queen’s University of Belfast, Institute of Irish Studies/Ulster Folk Museum, 1965. (Out of print.)


THE KERESAN BRIDGE: A PROBLEM IN PUEBLO ETHNOLOGY

London School of Economics Monographs in Social Anthropology, 35. London: The Athlone Press of the University of London, 1967. USA, Humanities Press, 1967.

Reprinted 2004, Oxford: Berg


KINSHIP AND MARRIAGE: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE

Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1967. New North American and world hardback ed., with new preface and biblio., Cambridge and New York, Cambridge University Press (Cambridge University Studies in Social Anthropology, 50) 1983. Trans. Into French (Gallimard, series Les Essais), German, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Hindi, Malay, Japanese..


THE IMPERIAL ANIMAL (With Lionel Tiger.)

New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 1971. Book of the Month Club alternate selection. English ed. 1972, Secker and Warburg. Paperbacks Dell (USA) and Penguin (UK). Second paperback with preface by Konrad Lorenz. Translations into Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese.) Reprinted in paperback with new introduction, Henry Holt (Owl Book) 1989 (Japanese Trans. Of same 1990.) Reprinted with new intro, Transaction Publishers, 1998.)


ENCOUNTER WITH ANTHROPOLOGY

New York: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovitch, 1973. Paperbacks Dell, New York; Penguin, England. Italian and Japanese Translations. Reissued with new preface and conclusion by Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick NJ, 1991.



BIOSOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Editor and Contributor. London: Malaby Press, and New York: Halsted Press, 1975 (French and Italian trans.)



THE TORY ISLANDERS: A PEOPLE OF THE CELTIC FRINGE

(New York and London: Cambridge University Press, 1978. (Japanese Trans. 1987.) 2nd Ed. with new preface, Notre Dame U. P. 1995.



THE RED LAMP OF INCEST: AN ENQUIRY INTO THE ORIGIN OF MIND AND SOCIETY

New York: E. P. Dutton, 1980. London: Hutchinson, 1981. Paperback edition with new preface, Notre Dame: The University of Notre Dame Press, 1983 (Spanish Translation 1992)



NEONATE COGNITION: BEYOND THE BLOOMING BUZZING CONFUSION


Editor and Contributor with Jacques Mehler. Hillsdale NJ : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1984



THE VIOLENT IMAGINATION

New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1989

(Nominated for the Victor Turner Award in Ethnographic Writing of the American Anthropological Association.) Reprinted in The Passionate Mind vide infra.



THE SEARCH FOR SOCIETY: QUEST FOR A BIOSOCIAL SCIENCE AND MORALITY

New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press. 1989.



REPRODUCTION AND SUCCESSION: STUDIES IN LAW, ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIETY.

New Brunswick N.J. and London Transaction Publishers, 1993.(Paperback ed. 1996; Japanese Translation 1999)




THE CHALLENGE OF ANTHROPOLOGY: OLD ENCOUNTERS AND NEW EXCURSIONS.

New Brunswick N.J. and London. Transaction Publishers, 1994. (Paperback ed. 1995; Japanese Translation 2002)



CONJECTURES AND CONFRONTATIONS: SCIENCE, EVOLUTION, SOCIAL CONCERN.

New Brunswick N.J.and London. Transaction Publishers, 1997



THE PASSIONATE MIND: SOURCES OF DESTRUCTION AND CREATIVITY.

(Incorporating The Violent Imagination, with a new introduction by Ashley Montagu) New Brunswick and London. Transaction Publishers 2000.



PARTICIPANT OBSERVER: MEMOIR OF A TRANSATLANTIC LIFE.

New Brunswick and London. Transaction Publishers, 2004.



THE TRIBAL IMAGINATION: CIVILIZATION AND THE SAVAGE MIND.

Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2011.



SHAKESPEARE’S EDUCATION: SCHOOLS, LAWSUITS, THEATER AND THE TUDOR MIRACLE.

Buchholst, Germany: Uwe Laugwitz Verlag, 2012








​Other recent books of note: 
Bernard Chapais: Primeval Kinship: How Pair-Bonding Gave Birth to Human Society (Harvard, 2008) is a major reworking of the ideas on kinship and marriage of Robin Fox and Claude Levi-Strauss, in the light of modern evolutionary, especially primatological,  studies.


Maximillian Holland: Social Bonding and Nurture Kinship: Compatibility between Cultural and Biological Approaches (LSE, 2012 - buy on Amazon) Another excellent and constructive discussion of matters in kinship and its cultural and biological components, handsomely reconciling what have been held to be incompatible positions.  A welcome revival of the work of John Bowlby in the context of  modern critical evolutionary theory.